Nigeria Exchange
News
About Us Advertise NgEX.com News Business Addresses Nigeria Events Newspapers Newsletter More
Search Nigeria Sites & Businesses Search Tips


 
News General Sports Business Odd / Funny Tech Entertainment Articles Author Login Comments More Categories Author List
 
Author Name: Musa Augustine
Number of articles: 4
Democracy the world over is believed to be the best system of government. Little wonder most developed... (0) Comment


Email A Friend  |   Print
 
Nigeria: Endorsing criminality or security failure?
Author: Musa Augustine | July 19, 2011



Call me a country boy and you are right, because I was born in a village called Boto Ikulu in Zango Kataf Local Government Area of Kaduna State. Call Boto a village or whatever, no one would argue because there is no governmentâs presence there. But one good thing I will live not to forget about the village is peace and care for one another. During my childhood when soldiers came to the village for the burial of a colleague of who happen to be an indigene of the village, almost half of the population fled for safety as most of them had never seen what a uniform man is apart from our traditional rulers who settled, conflicts and disputes. The brave ones that were able to stay behind had the opportunity to discuss with some of these uniform men where they said, âOur sole responsibility is to protect people like you who are civilians, and to defendthe sovereignty of the country. Beautiful, you would say. The burial was over, and life continued. Who would I see again, a policeman who came to carry out an arrest, I was shocked. As a child, I began to ask questions, then somebody told me that the sole responsibility of the police was to arrest and prosecute those who break the law, and solders were to defend the country This was what security meant in those days. Looking at the situation in Nigeria today, reverse is the case as many questions remain unanswered about the level of security in country. I was shocked when I went to a news stand to pick a copy of a national daily, glancing at the front page the leading story was âDPO,DCO killed ⦠CP whereabout unknown.â Going through the story it was a clashed between the police and soldiers in Lagos. And I quickly remember in the same Lagos where a woman was battered by two Navy officers to an extent of pulling her half naked in the public, from where I begin to question the attitude of these people who are employed to protect us. Let go back to the days of military regime, most especially the days of General Sani Abacha who at that time told Nigerians to sleep with two eyes closed for his regime would not treat security issue with child glove. Little wonder last month when Abachaâs family commemorated 13 years anniversary of his dead, his son, Mohammed Abacha said in the occasion âHad it been my father is still alive, there would have being nothing like Boko Haram.â No doubt, during the military junta compare to what we are seeing today, security in the country was dependable. But the most unfortunate thing today, when democracy is the fact that democracy robbed us of the respect for human lives. First is the OPC in the South-west where many lives were lost owing to their criminal activities in the name of protecting âour region.â I watched with tears the remains of a 400 level medical student of the Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Mr. Auwalu Shanono who lost his precious life to these disgruntled elements. Auwalu Shanono had, before his death, demonstrated a great his zeal for services of humanity as it was said that he and his colleagues were coming back from a seminar on child-maternal mortality before the ugly incident. Secondly, the Niger Delta militancy came on board, embarked on the same criminality of killing, raping and kidnapping in the name of protecting âour region.â The amazing thing is, a situation where those who we depend on for safety, who are employed to defend the country, arrest and prosecute criminals, in the midst of this criminality appear to have forgotten their sole responsibility and instead engaging each other in a confrontation over nothing. Although we cannot deny the fact that our security standard, most especially the military, is internationally recognized because of the role Nigerian soldiers are playing in peace-keeping mission. But what an embarrassment to the country internationally that Army and police are fighting each other in this critical time that the country is facing security challenges. As an observer of events and development in the country, I watched the Inspector General of Police, Mr. Hafiz Ringim on the television with relieve, when he was saying âBoko Haram, their days are numbered,â I said to myself, âYes! Our security men are rising up to the challenges and are now battle ready for the criminality eating deep into the country,â only to wake up with shock on 16 June, 2011 that Boko Haram had bombed Police Headquarters in the countryâs capital city of Abuja. And as if that was not enough, in less than six hours, there was bomb explosion in Maiduguri, apart from several attacks on police officers and stations in some parts of the North by the Boko Haram. The question I asked then was why should the police chief declared such a war against the Boko Haram without having a stand yet? How this bomber gained entrance into the Police Headquarters and up to the parking space undictated by the police. As if our service chiefs had not learnt any lesson from that incident, I listened the Chief of Army Staff, Lieutenant-General Azubuike Ihejirika, in Jaji on Friday, 1st June, 2011, during the graduation ceremony of the course 33 of Army Senior Officers, saying âBoko Haram are cowards.â Also, President Goodluck Jonathan, through his Vice, Arc. Mohammed Namadi Sambo, warned the Boko Haram sect that enough is enough. The General, President, a cricket that has one leg does not wait till rainfall before digging its hole. I think what we need now is action rather than warning or abuse. The disappointing issue here is any time such ugly incident takes place, the only response from the security is, âWe are on top of the situation, we would make sure the perpetrators faced the wrath of the law of the land, but at the end of the day, nothing comes out of it. And on the part of the government, they will always set up committees to investigate the remote causes of the ugly incident and possible solutions aimed at avoiding reccurrence, claiming to be ignorant of the fact that poverty, illiteracy and unemployment (hunger) are responsible for all this criminality. I shivered when the Lemu Panel stormed Bauchi State with a woman who described herself as Mrs. Veronica Ejiofor was testifying before the panel how she watched her late husband being killed and his remains set ablaze. Their house was also burned down in the presence of security men who could not avert the irate mob. She also said that some of them who were able to gain access to the police station were either killed or injured. I recall from the inaugural speech of Governor Abdulazeez Yari Abubakar of Zamfara State where he said, âIt is high time we brought to an end the abject poverty among our people. We cannot continue to allow our people sleep with empty stomach. It is time we sent our children who have been hawking on our streets back to school. And more importantly, we must tackle idleness (unemployment) among our youths who have been roaming our cities.â The governor went further to say that, âIf we continue to allow our youths roaming about without anything to fend for themselves, there is no doubt the society would become nuisance.â If the government of the day can borrow a leaf from Governor Abdulazeez, and tackle poverty, illiteracy and unemployment, the issue of Boko Haram, OPC, militancy would become a thing of the past. Let us look at it the other way, the case with OPC in the South-west has said to be grievances, the same thing with militancy in the Niger Delta, and the North which had earlier been the patient dog, is today, I believe, the North has been pushed to the wall. Believe me, anybody that comes to the North today would be convinced that the North is a victim of abject poverty, illiteracy and unemployment. Our leaders seem to be doing little or nothing to confront these obvious challenges. Many people are ignorant of this impression âBOKO HARAMâ as it is literarily interpreted, means âeducation is a sin.â But as I understand it, that is not the case, although not surprising as some people interpreted it that way just to give the North a bad name. If members of Boko Haram today can come out publicly, you would be convinced that these people hold certificates of different higher institutions of learning in this country. They are not illiterate, they are learned. To my own belief, what exactly these people mean by (Boko Haram) is, frustration individuals who were opportune to acquire education and are marginalised by the so-called leaders we have in the North The leaders have done nothing to help them. Even as the situation has come to this stage, these people who are shouldered with the responsibility to address the challenges confronting the region, are today sitting on top of their mansions watching the situation worsening, watching the people suffering, watching the hard-earned legacies of the noble leader of the region (Sardauna of Sokoto) deteriorating.

(2) Comment


More From Musa Augustine



Comments

NGEX welcomes and encourages reader comments. Permission to post reader comments is assumed, and we reserve the right to excerpt or edit for clarity any comments that are posted. We won't be able to publish all comments. And we can't vouch for the accuracy of posts from readers. Nickname or Name will be used to identify your post.
Unachukwu Duru    Ibadan, Nigeria    July 19, 2011
Mr Augustine is right to the extent that Government has not shown the will or determination to contain the Boko Haram menace. The pussy-footing sends the signal of an administration hamstrung with a perplexing puzzle of how to deal with sacred cows, who get in the way of decision, or of fear of criticism for the collateral cost of decisive action.

Either way, the government has shown weakness. It has betrayed the innocent victims of the blood thirsty Boko Haram who entrusted their fate and right to security in their hands. With sad regret, the realization of this mistake has come way too late for the unfortunate innocent victims.
He is also right that had Gen . Abacha (may his soul rest in peace) been alive today as Head of State, Boko Haram would have been history, forgotten.. I also believe that the sect would not show up had it been Gowon, Babangida, Buhari, or Shagari on the saddle. The existence of Boko Haram predates the Jonathan presidency. Their activities were subdued during Obasanjo -ex-military , and Yar'Adua-moslem. The paradigm raises a conspiracy theory, and crystallizes a conjecture that some grand agenda may be in the works. Jonathan, a Southerner Christian, is civilian with no military pedigree. So, if that is, or not, the case, why are the northerners doing this and what is going on? It would be disaster if investigations prove, by any shred of evidence, that the escalation of brutal terrorism is a protestation against the leadership profiled by President Jonathan. Should that be the case, we should all be very ready to immediately kiss this fractious Nigerian white elephant goodbye.
But Mr. Augustine knows it as much as we all do that the poverty and desperation afflicting the populace is not exclusive to the North northern youths. The South is teeming with huge populations of poor youths who work hard and get nothing. Their sad plight and desperation was brought upon them largely by the bad governance of Northern islamic leaders that have ruled Nigeria. And patiently and gracefully they have endured with incredible discipline that has been misjudged as naivety. I subject myself to corrections here.
Mr Augustine has opined that members of the deadly Boko Haram are educated young men who, by all standards, cannot be stereotyped as ignorant religious zealots. He tries to clean things up by suggesting that Boko Haram ideologues do not really mean that Western education is sin. In other words, these murderers hide behind the mask of a diversionary faith-based ideology to push an agenda that bear treasonable hallmarks. He has come a little economical with the facts. We are all aware of the diversity of ethno-religious cultures values of our communities. I may wish to disclose that I was raised in Jos, and a proud old graduate of St Theresa's Catholic School.
We all know how tenaciously the Hausa community holds on to conservatism and how an imported religious doctrine has supplanted an original cultural identity. It is such that the term Hausa-Fulani is a synonymous with islam. We do have Yoruba islamics, and they have not traded their ethnic identity for a an imported religious culture. The same goes for the Christians of the the rest of Nigeria.
The Islamics confine their youths in mosques and madrasas where the memorization and recitation of chapters of the Koran are taught nearly all day long. Their only break is when, bowl in hand, these youths are turned into the streets and prayer venues, mainly on Fridays, to ask for arms fot their upkeep. And they call them almajiris. Another case is the fulani cattle herdsman. How on earth does anybody convert him to modern life-stock farming methods or education? Everywhere they go they kick up dust into people's eyes and inconsiderately devastate farm crops with their animals. The almajiris are an easy poll of willing tools in the hands of Northern politicians whose handouts buy them over, body and soul. Like zombies, they to do the bidding and political dirty jobs, while hailing the 'benefactor" with 'Ranka i-dede!" and a regular response of "Allah Ba"m m'ba ka". And sure enough, these youths wait to line up for the next round, whenever it comes, for the 'Allah's windfall that must go through the 'benefactor' , who then decides how much of it is sprinkled around and how much trickles down. They power of the dogmatic brainwash makes the almajiri to accept without question the sacrosanct position of the 'Benefactor' as the only channel of influence with Allah. Blinded with impervious religious blinkers, the almajiris neither get enthusiastic nor encouraged to directly approach the same Allah for a share of the heavenly windfall. They don't even bother with aspiring for improved their way or standard of living as long as there this benevolent individual to look up to. And who are these 'benevolent' men? The selfish, greedy Northern political elite, of course, who have cornered the resources meant for these people.. The Northern islamic elite, by choice, created the monster which they now turn loose on the rest of us,. Their damage control plan is dishing out doses of misrepresentations to deflect the the blame for the pervasive indolence at the wrong directions, fueling a north-south confrontation The poor frustrated masses in the mainly Christian South have never targeted vengeful violence at their islamic neighbors, as reprisal for the misrule of northern islamic leadership.
To unleash terror on the rest of society is not only unfair, but also gratuitous. It is nothing but naked, starry-eyed, arm-twisting blackmail that will never work. The Igbos of Nigeria did not go anywhere close to the murderous menace of the Boko Haram. You are aware of the role played by your kinsman Yakubu Gowon in 1966. Under his watch over 30,000 Igbo civilians were ruthless massacred for no other reason than they were Igbos; not for disruptive street protests or for rampaging as religious zealots. In the resulting civil war, there was no discrimination as to who were rebels or who were not.. Anything that moved in front of the Gowon's advancing army was mowed down- men women and children.
For the Boko Haram, sworn terrorists that threaten the very foundation of Nigeria's existence, the Nation must go through the indignity of getting into dialog, appease them and pay out amnesty money to save the endangered Northern elite from the furry of a monster they created for themselves.
Some communities need to take a hard introspective look at those cultural values and shared beliefs that fall out of stride with today's world order. The nation cannot afford to remain fettered down with retrogressive values of communities who, by choice, hold on to blinding conservatism and constitute a drag. Such communities must keep abreast or drop off and ship out.
Unachukwu Duru    Ibadan, Nigeria    July 19, 2011
Mr Augustine is right to the extent that Government has not shown the will or determination to contain the Boko Haram menace. The pussy-footing sends the signal of an administration hamstrung with a perplexing puzzle of how to deal with sacred cows, who get in the way of decision, or of fear of criticism for the collateral cost of decisive action. Either way, the government has shown weakness.

It has betrayed the innocent victims of the blood thirsty Boko Haram who entrusted their fate and right to security in their hands. With sad regret, the realization of this mistake has come way too late for the unfortunate innocent victims.

He is also right that had Gen . Abacha (may his soul rest in peace) been alive today as Head of State, Boko Haram would have been history, forgotten.. I also believe that the sect would not show up had it been Gowon, Babangida, Buhari, or Shagari on the saddle. The existence of Boko Haram predates the Jonathan presidency. Their activities were subdued during Obasanjo -ex-military , and Yar'Adua-moslem. The paradigm raises a conspiracy theory, and crystallizes a conjecture that some grand agenda may be in the works.

Jonathan, a Southerner Christian, is civilian with no military pedigree. So, if that is, or not, the case, why are the northerners doing this and what is going on? It would be disaster if investigations prove, by any shred of evidence, that the escalation of brutal terrorism is a protestation against the leadership profiled by President Jonathan. Should that be the case, we should all be very ready to immediately kiss this fractious Nigerian white elephant goodbye.

But Mr. Augustine knows it as much as we all do that the poverty and desperation afflicting the populace is not exclusive to the North northern youths. The South is teeming with huge populations of poor youths who work hard and get nothing. Their sad plight and desperation was brought upon them largely by the bad governance of Northern islamic leaders that have ruled Nigeria. And patiently and gracefully they have endured with incredible discipline that has been misjudged as naivety. I subject myself to corrections here.

Mr Augustine has opined that members of the deadly Boko Haram are educated young men who, by all standards, cannot be stereotyped as ignorant religious zealots. He tries to clean things up by suggesting that Boko Haram ideologues do not really mean that Western education is sin. In other words, these murderers hide behind the mask of a diversionary faith-based ideology to push an agenda that bear treasonable hallmarks. He has come a little economical with the facts. We are all aware of the diversity of ethno-religious cultures values of our communities. I may wish to disclose that I was raised in Jos, and a proud old graduate of St Theresa's Catholic School.

We all know how tenaciously the Hausa community holds on to conservatism and how an imported religious doctrine has supplanted an original cultural identity. It is such that the term Hausa-Fulani is a synonymous with islam. We do have Yoruba islamics, and they have not traded their ethnic identity for a an imported religious culture. The same goes for the Christians of the the rest of Nigeria.

The Islamics confine their youths in mosques and madrasas where the memorization and recitation of chapters of the Koran are taught nearly all day long. Their only break is when, bowl in hand, these youths are turned into the streets and prayer venues, mainly on Fridays, to ask for arms fot their upkeep. And they call them almajiris. Another case is the fulani cattle herdsman.

How on earth does anybody convert him to modern life-stock farming methods or education? Everywhere they go they kick up dust into people's eyes and inconsiderately devastate farm crops with their animals. The almajiris are an easy poll of willing tools in the hands of Northern politicians whose handouts buy them over, body and soul. Like zombies, they to do the bidding and political dirty jobs, while hailing the 'benefactor" with 'Ranka i-dede!" and a regular response of "Allah Ba"m m'ba ka". And sure enough, these youths wait to line up for the next round, whenever it comes, for the 'Allah's windfall that must go through the 'benefactor' , who then decides how much of it is sprinkled around and how much trickles down.

They power of the dogmatic brainwash makes the almajiri to accept without question the sacrosanct position of the 'Benefactor' as the only channel of influence with Allah. Blinded with impervious religious blinkers, the almajiris neither get enthusiastic nor encouraged to directly approach the same Allah for a share of the heavenly windfall.

They don't even bother with aspiring for improved their way or standard of living as long as there this benevolent individual to look up to. And who are these 'benevolent' men? The selfish, greedy Northern political elite, of course, who have cornered the resources meant for these people.. The Northern islamic elite, by choice, created the monster which they now turn loose on the rest of us,.

Their damage control plan is dishing out doses of misrepresentations to deflect the the blame for the pervasive indolence at the wrong directions, fueling a north-south confrontation The poor frustrated masses in the mainly Christian South have never targeted vengeful violence at their islamic neighbors, as reprisal for the misrule of northern islamic leadership.

To unleash terror on the rest of society is not only unfair, but also gratuitous. It is nothing but naked, starry-eyed, arm-twisting blackmail that will never work. The Igbos of Nigeria did not go anywhere close to the murderous menace of the Boko Haram. You are aware of the role played by your kinsman Yakubu Gowon in 1966.

Under his watch over 30,000 Igbo civilians were ruthless massacred for no other reason than they were Igbos; not for disruptive street protests or for rampaging as religious zealots. In the resulting civil war, there was no discrimination as to who were rebels or who were not.. Anything that moved in front of the Gowon's advancing army was mowed down- men women and children.

For the Boko Haram, sworn terrorists that threaten the very foundation of Nigeria's existence, the Nation must go through the indignity of getting into dialog, appease them and pay out amnesty money to save the endangered Northern elite from the furry of a monster they created for themselves.

Some communities need to take a hard introspective look at those cultural values and shared beliefs that fall out of stride with today's world order. The nation cannot afford to remain fettered down with retrogressive values of communities who, by choice, hold on to blinding conservatism and constitute a drag. Such communities must keep abreast or drop off and ship out.
Results » 1-2 of 2      Result Page »  <   1  >
"The views and opinions expressed in these comment(s) or article(s) do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of NGEX, its partners or its affiliates."


 
follow NgEX on Facebook
 
Submit An Article
 
"Press Releases"    More »
IS THIS TRULY MUTINY?????????
Abiodun Idris | December 22, 2014
Greatest Nigeria students and masses of our dear country. I want to start this write up by saluting...
Submit A Press Release »
 
News / Comments   More »
Debts: What you should know as a Nigerian entrepreneur
February 25, 2016 | Gary Crenshaw | 1 posts
It is normal for businesses to owe money at the beginning of a business. That's what separates entrepreneur...  Post comment »
 
Article / Comments   More »
Yoruba Origin Of Bini & Da Lagosians
July 29, 2017 |  N/A | 1 posts
This article is full of nonsense  Post comment »
Abani, Emeagwali, Oyibo: Trouble in Nigerian Paradise
April 29, 2013 |  Ojonimi Adegbe | 1 posts
Great article. I think this should be placed more out there for people to read and if possible for the...  Post comment »
Ribadu Remains The Only Saint That Led Anti-Corruption EFCC
December 19, 2016 |  Lawrence | 1 posts
Interesting piece. Let's continue to speak out.  Post comment »
 
 
Poll
 
Submit An Article
 
 
     
 
Copyright © 2005 -2013 NgEX. All rights reserved.